Click here for the Problem Extension Worksheet version of the Problems of the Week.
Click here for an MS Word version of the Problems of the Week.
Click here for the Canadian Problem Extension Worksheet version of the Problems of the Week.
Click here for a Canadian MS Word version of the Problems of the Week.

Lower Elementary:
Question: Kyle is paying for a dinner. The entire dinner came to $33.50. Kyle paid with a $25 gift card and a $20 bill. How much change will Kyle get back?
Answer: $11.50
Solution: With a $25 gift card and a $20 bill, Kyle is paying $25 + $20 = $45 for the dinner. Since the dinner cost $33.50, the change Kyle will receive is $45 – $33.50 = $11.50.

Upper Elementary:
Question: Annie is cooking breakfast. She starts with a full carton of 18 eggs and fries two thirds of them, but she burns a quarter of the eggs she fries. How many eggs does Annie fry successfully?
Answer: 9 eggs
Solution: Annie fries ⅔ × 18 = 12 eggs. If Annie burns a quarter of those, that means she burns ¼ × 12 = 3 eggs. Since she fries a total of 12 eggs, Annie successfully fries 12 – 3 = 9 eggs without burning them.

Middle School:
Question: An order of bacon and an order of pancakes cost $11.00 altogether. An order of pancakes and a cold-pressed juice cost $10 altogether. A cold-pressed juice and an order of bacon cost $9 altogether. If all menu items cost whole-dollar amounts, how much does a double-order of pancakes cost?
Answer: $12
Solution: The juice and pancakes together cost $1 more than the juice and bacon, so we know that the pancakes must cost $1 more than the bacon. The only whole-dollar amounts with a difference of $1 that add up to $11 for bacon and pancakes are $5 and $6 respectively. So, a double-order of pancakes costs $6 × 2 = $12.

Algebra and Up:
Question: Five people sit down for a fancy dinner. Each of their napkins is folded into a different origami animal—a swan, a frog, a rabbit, a fish, a pig, or a turtle. The person at the head of the table always gets the rabbit. How many different ways can the napkins be arranged around the table?
Answer: 120
Solution: Because the rabbit must be at the head of the table, we only need to find the number of possible animals for the other 4 place settings. There are 5 options for the first place setting’s animal, followed by 4 remaining options for the next place setting, 3 for the third place setting, and 2 for the fourth. To find the number of possible combinations, we multiply the number of possibilities for each place setting together. So, there are 5 × 4 × 3 × 2 = 120 possible arrangements.